O`ver*set" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Overset; p. pr. & vb. n. Oversetting. ]

1.

To turn or tip (anything) over from an upright, or a proper, position so that it lies upon its side or bottom upwards; to upset; as, to overset a chair, a coach, a ship, or a building.

Dryden.

2.

To cause to fall, or to tail; to subvert; to overthrow; as, to overset a government or a plot.

Addison.

3.

To fill too full.

[Obs.]

Howell.

 

© Webster 1913.


O`ver*set", v. i.

To turn, or to be turned, over; to be upset.

Mortimer.

 

© Webster 1913.


O"ver*set` (?), n.

1.

An upsetting; overturn; overthrow; as, the overset of a carriage.

2.

An excess; superfluity.

[Obs.] "This overset of wealth and pomp. "

Bp. Burnel.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.