Nod (?), v. i. [OE. nodden; cf. OHG. kntn, genuotn, to shake, and E. nudge.]

1.

To bend or incline the upper part, with a quick motion; as, nodding plumes.

2.

To incline the head with a quick motion; to make a slight bow; to make a motion of assent, of salutation, or of drowsiness, with the head; as, to nod at one.

3.

To be drowsy or dull; to be careless.

Nor is it Homer nods, but we that dream. Pope.

 

© Webster 1913.


Nod, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Nodded (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Nodding.]

1.

To incline or bend, as the head or top; to make a motion of assent, of salutation, or of drowsiness with; as, to nod the head.

2.

To signify by a nod; as, to nod approbation.

3.

To cause to bend.

[Poetic]

By every wind that nods the mountain pine. Keats.

 

© Webster 1913.


Nod (?), n.

1.

A dropping or bending forward of the upper oart or top of anything.

Like a drunken sailor on a mast, Ready with every nod to tumble down. Shak.

2.

A quick or slight downward or forward motion of the head, in assent, in familiar salutation, in drowsiness, or in giving a signal, or a command.

A look or a nod only ought to correct them [the children] when they do amiss. Locke.

Nations obey my word and wait my nod. Prior.

The land of Nod, sleep.

 

© Webster 1913.

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