"Nobody snuggles with Max Power. You strap yourself in and feel the 'G's!" " - Max Power (aka Homer Simpson) to Marge Simpson, "Homer to the Max"

When the new TV series Police Cops went on the air in 1999 Springfield resident and television junkie Homer Simpson was elated to see that the show's suave police officer hero shared the same name as his own. TV's Homer Simpson was a Don Johnson/Miami Vice kind of man, wearing kicky white scarfs and tossing bullets at criminals with enough force to act as a gunshot. The real Homer briefly enjoyed the fame that came with a celebrity moniker, but after the pilot episode of the series the creators changed the Simpson character into an overweight comic buffoon. Mocked by the public, the real Homer appealed to the show to change the character back, but his request was refused. Seeing no other way to rectify the situation, Homer went before Judge Snyder and sought a name change. After being denied the names Rembrandt Q. Einstein, Handsome B. Wonderful, and Hercules Rockefeller, Homer was given the only name on his wish list that he spelled correctly: Max Power (which he took from a hairdryer).

As Homer Simpson our hero was just an average guy, but as Max Power he became dynamic, decisive, magnetic, and uncompromising. He befriended local dynamo Trent Steele (a man who owns a company that makes computers... or it could be a computer that makes companies), took a liking to Thai food, began wearing shirts with his name monogrammed above the front pocket (his entire name along with some exclamation points and a pirate flag, not just initials), and even his boss started to remember his name. Before too long Max/Homer had hooked up with the local celebrity protest group in Springfield and after hobnobbing with Bill Clinton, Ed Begley, Jr., and Lorne Michaels, Max wound up at a "save the trees" rally where he accidentially cut down a cherished redwood while fleeing the police. Now that the name "Max Power" had come to be reviled by all, he had his name changed back to Homer Simpson, a name that turned out to be not so bad after all.


References:
http://www.snpp.com

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