A fancy word for hole.

Specifically, a lacuna is what frustrates you when you are reading a manuscript a
                                                                      .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
                                                                                                                     .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
 .  .  .  .
                 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
                                he gunwale, and the fish.

It's worth noting that lacunæ are in the text, not in the book: the book doesn't have to have a literal hole, it might just as well be smeared, or scribbled over irreparably, or whatever.

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La*cu"na (?), n.; pl. L. Lacunae (#); E. Lacunas (#). [L., ditch, pit, lake, orig., anything hollow. See Lagoon.]

1.

A small opening; a small pit or depression; a small blank space; a gap or vacancy; a hiatus.

2. Biol.

A small opening; a small depression or cavity; a space, as a vacant space between the cells of plants, or one of the spaces left among the tissues of the lower animals, which serve in place of vessels for the circulation of the body fluids, or the cavity or sac, usually of very small size, in a mucous membrane.

 

© Webster 1913.

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