user since
Sat Jan 27 2001 at 01:40:12 (13.6 years ago )
last seen
Sun Aug 10 2014 at 23:41:58 (1.6 weeks ago )
number of write-ups
399 - View Jurph's writeups (feed)
level / experience
16 (Panjandrum) / 27710
C!s spent
268
mission drive within everything
I can save you if you can save me.
specialties
Led Zeppelin, vocal percussion, poetry, Phish, ballistic missiles, urban climbing, pyromania, eye contact, and pranks.
school/company
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab
motto
"There is no teacher but the enemy."
most recent writeup
Hajji
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)) s h e s a i d " I DO . " ((






j . r . p a r s o n s @ g m a i l . c o m
8 3 1 ½ M c H e n r y S t r e e t
B a l t i m o r e , M D 2 1 2 3 0
4 1 0 . 2 4 4 . 8 1 2 5

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Chauntlucet encourages the moon to sing. The song the moon knows is apparently very beautiful and can cure leprosy or madness in any who hear it. Daedalus's Rose is a fairly complicated procedure devised by Martin Pale for preserving emotions, vices and virtues in amber or honey or beeswax. When the preserving medium is warmed, the imprisoned qualities are released. The Rose has -- or rather had -- a huge number of applications. It could be used to dispense courage to oneself or inflict cowardice on one's enemy; it could provoke love, lust, nobility of purpose, anger, jealousy, ambition, self-sacrifice, etc. etc. Like many spells with unusual names, The Unrobed Ladies was a great deal less exciting than it sounded. The lasies of the title were only a kind of woodland flower which was used in a spell to bind a fairy's powers. The flower was required to be stripped of leaves and petals -- hence the "unrobing". Teilo's Hand was an ancient fairy spell which halted all sorts of things: rain fire, wind, coursing water or blood. It presumably was named after the fairy who had first taught it to an English magician. Martin Pale's Restoration and Rectification was a spell which reversed the effects of a recent calamity. Belasis's Scopus is a spell to detect magic. It appears in The Instructions by Jacques Belasis.