An inept person; a dolt.

- american underworld dictionary - 1950

In the US Military, JAG stands for "Judge Advocate General". This is the head Judge Advocate in charge of providing legal services in the military.

A primetime TV show on CBS shown on Tuesdays at 8pm EST. It is about the JAG Corps of the Navy as listed above. It stars David James Elliott as Cmdr. Harmon "Harm" Rabb, Catherine Bell as Lt. Col. Sarah "Mac" MacKenzie, John M. Jackson as Admiral A. J. Chegwidden, Patrick Labyorteaux as Lt. Bud Roberts, and Karri Turner as Lt. j.g. Harriet Sims.

JAG is a decent show in my opinion, overall. However, the plots are very hokey sometimes, and this season's shows haven't been as good as last season's. Rudy from survivor made a guest apperance this year, which was kind of neat.

Harm is a former navy pilot who had to stop flying so he went to law school. Mac is a Marine who is more attractive than most colonels are. The Admiral is one of the coolest bosses, and reminds me of Captain Picard. Bud is decent comic relief. Don't expect too me show or you'll be disappointed, but it is entertaining.

Jag (?), n. [Prob. of Celtic origin; cf. W. gag aperture, cleft, chink; akin to Ir. & Gael. gag.] [Written also jagg.]

1.

A notch; a cleft; a barb; a ragged or sharp protuberance; a denticulation.

Arethuss arose . . .
From rock and from jag.
Shelley.

Garments thus beset with long jags.
Holland.

2.

A part broken off; a fragment. Bp. Hacket.

3. (Bot.)

A cleft or division.

Jag bolt, a bolt with a nicked or barbed shank which resists retraction, as when leaded into stone.

 

© Webster 1913


Jag, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Jagged (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Jagging (?).]

To cut into notches or teeth like those of a saw; to notch. [Written also jagg.]

Jagging iron, a wheel with a zigzag or jagged edge for cutting cakes or pastry into ornamental figures.

 

© Webster 1913


Jag, n. [Scot. jag, jaug, a leather bag or wallet, a pocket. Cf. Jag a notch.]

A small load, as of hay or grain in the straw, or of ore. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U.S.] [Written also jagg.] Forby.

 

© Webster 1913


Jag, v. t.

To carry, as a load; as, to jag hay, etc. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U.S.]

 

© Webster 1913


Jag, n.

1.

A leather bag or wallet; pl.,

saddlebags. [Scot.]

2.

Enough liquor to make a man noticeably drunk; a small "load;" a time or case of drunkeness; -- esp. in phr. To have a jag on, to be drunk. [Slang, U. S. & Dial. Eng.]

 

© Webster 1913

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