In Roger Zelazny's Second Chronicles of Amber, he has a little fun with Carroll's poem. The character Luke is dosed with LSD, which causes his Shadow walking power to drag him (and Merlin with him) into the trippy Shadows. A jabberwock makes an appearance, and there is a bit of other Wonderland stuff going on.

Jabberwock

from the AD&D Monsterous appendix 3

CREATURE TYPE: Monster
CLIMATE/TERRAIN: Any/Forests
FREQUENCY: VR
ORGANIZATION: Solitary
ACTIVITY CYCLE: Any
DIET: Carnivore
INTELLIGENCE: 4
TREASURE: incidental
ALIGNMENT: N
NO. APPEARING: 1
ARMOR CLASS: -10
MOVEMENT: 15, Fl 15 (C)
HIT DICE: 15 (99 hp)
THAC0: 5
NO. OF ATTACKS: 1 or 8
DAMAGE/ATTACK: 3d10 or special
SPECIAL ATTACKS: Yes
SPECIAL DEFENSES: Yes
MAGIC RESISTANCE: 80%
SIZE: G
MORALE: 20
XP VALUE: 25,000
HOME PLANE: Prime Material
PAGE NO.: MAIII 66
resembles dragon, fiercely territorial, chosen victim is persued until death (or teleport, leave forest area, etc), can see invisible & hidden objects, attack: bite, can burble & all 200' save -4 vs spell or confusion & babble, immune to all non-vorpal weap, has dragon fear, eyebeams (save vs paraly or paralyzed), grasp prey w/talons, can lash out in multi direct
The Jabberwock, as mentioned above, was a dragon-like creature mentioned in a poem in Through the Looking Glass. This monstrosity also appears in American McGee's Alice. He works for the Queen of Hearts, and is a thoroughly sadistic and hateful creature.

His torso is a furnace, his eyes are quite literally like burning coals, and his wings are metal. He embodies the fire which killed Alice's family and started her on this mad quest, and he physically and verbally berates Alice for abandoning her family to save herself during the conflagration. He attacks by spitting fire, swinging his claws, or shooting searing death rays from his eyes. In short, he is *nasty*.

The Jabberwock's eye is one of the components needed to power the Jabberwock's Eyestaff, one of the most powerful weapons in the game.

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