In`di*vis"i*ble (?), a. [L. indivisibilis: cf. F. indivisible. See In- not, and Divisible.]

1.

Not divisible; incapable of being divided, separated, or broken; not separable into parts.

"One indivisible point of time."

Dryden.

2. Math.

Not capable of exact division, as one quantity by another; incommensurable.

 

© Webster 1913.


In`di*vis"i*ble, n.

1.

That which is indivisible.

By atom, nobody will imagine we intend to express a perfect indivisible, but only the least sort of natural bodies. Digby.

2. Geom.

An infinitely small quantity which is assumed to admit of no further division.

Method of indivisibles, a kind of calculus, formerly in use, in which lines were considered as made up of an infinite number of points; surfaces, as made up of an infinite number of lines; and volumes, as made up of an infinite number of surfaces.

 

© Webster 1913.

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