Im`por*tune" (?), a. [F. importun, L. importunus; pref. im- not + a derivative from the root of portus harbor, importunus therefore orig. meaning, hard of access. See Port harbor, and cf. Importunate.]

1.

Inopportune; unseasonable. [Obs.]

2.

Troublesome; vexatious; persistent; urgent; hence, vexatious on account of untimely urgency or pertinacious solicitation. [Obs.]

And their importune fates all satisfied.
Spenser.

Of all other affections it [envy] is the most importune and continual.
Bacon.

 

© Webster 1913


Im`por*tune", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Importuned (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Importuning.] [From Importune, a.: cf. F. importuner.]

1.

To request or solicit, with urgency; to press with frequent, unreasonable, or troublesome application or pertinacity; hence, to tease; to irritate; to worry.

Their ministers and residents here have perpetually importuned the court with unreasonable demands.
Swift.

2.

To import; to signify. [Obs.] "It importunes death." Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913


Im`por*tune", v. i.

To require; to demand. [Obs.]

We shall write to you,
As time and our concernings shall importune.
Shak.

 

© Webster 1913

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.