The phrase "I and I" comes both from the desire to unite mankind, and from the belief that Jah is a part of everyone. Instead of referring directly to Jah or the self separately, many Rastafarians will use the term "I and I" to refer to the self and Jah as a part of the self — it is an expression of the oneness of Jah and Mankind.

In some cases "I and I" may be used to refer to the Rastafarian community, symbolizing the unity of all Rastafarians and the spirit of Jah that flows in each one of them.

I and I is an expression to totalize the concept of oneness, the oneness of two persons. So God is within all of us and we're one people in fact. I and I means that God is in all men. The bond of Ras Tafari is the bond of God, of man. But man itself needs a head and the head of man is His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia.

E. E. Cashmore, Rastafarian scholar

Ain't no rules, ain't no vow, we can do it anyhow,
I and I will see you through,
'Cause every day we pay the price with a little sacrifice,
Jammin' 'til the jam is through.

Robert Nesta Marley, "Jammin'"

Don't care what the world say;
I and I couldn't ever go astray.
Just like a bright and sunny day:
Oh, we're gonna have things our way.

—Robert Nesta Marley, "Natty Dread"

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