A multiplayer game played on text terminals in the 1980s. The version I saw ran on 4.2BSD. Characters appeared on screen using one of these graphics:
  • <
  • ^
  • >
  • v
showing which way they were facing. The map was a maze, and you could only see a part of it, according to strict visibility rules (similar to those of rogue and nethack). Several players could share the map.

The objective of the game was to shoot other players (repeatedly). You could also stab them, or even bomb them using various conveniently-situated explosive packs, grenades, mines and the like. The game's extreme realism dictated that walls could be destroyed (however, they would grow back; so much for realism in computer games). Team play was also possible.

To this day, the memory of hunt lives on: it is supplied with some Linux distributions, along with a script run by init to delete the sockets from /tmp that huntd (the game's daemon) would leave behind.

Hunt (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hunted; p. pr. & vb. n. Hunting.] [AS. huntian to hunt; cf. hentan to follow, pursue, Goth. hin&?;an (in comp.) to seize. √36. Cf. Hent.]

1.

To search for or follow after, as game or wild animals; to chase; to pursue for the purpose of catching or killing; to follow with dogs or guns for sport or exercise; as, to hunt a deer.

Like a dog, he hunts in dreams.
Tennyson.

2.

To search diligently after; to seek; to pursue; to follow; -- often with out or up; as, to hunt up the facts; to hunt out evidence.

Evil shall hunt the violent man to overthrow him.
Ps. cxl. 11.

3.

To drive; to chase; -- with down, from, away, etc.; as, to hunt down a criminal; he was hunted from the parish.

4.

To use or manage in the chase, as hounds.

He hunts a pack of dogs.
Addison.

5.

To use or traverse in pursuit of game; as, he hunts the woods, or the country.

 

© Webster 1913


Hunt, v. i.

1.

To follow the chase; to go out in pursuit of game; to course with hounds.

Esau went to the field to hunt for venison.
Gen. xxvii. 5.

2.

To seek; to pursue; to search; -- with for or after.

He after honor hunts, I after love.
Shak.

To hunt counter, to trace the scent backward in hunting, as a hound to go back on one's steps. [Obs.] Shak.

 

© Webster 1913


Hunt, n.

1.

The act or practice of chasing wild animals; chase; pursuit; search.

The hunt is up; the morn is bright and gray.
Shak.

2.

The game secured in the hunt. [Obs.] Shak.

3.

A pack of hounds. [Obs.]

4.

An association of huntsmen.

5.

A district of country hunted over.

Every landowner within the hunt.
London Field.

 

© Webster 1913


Hunt, v. i.

1. (Mach.)

To be in a state of instability of movement or forced oscillation, as a governor which has a large movement of the balls for small change of load, an arc-lamp clutch mechanism which moves rapidly up and down with variations of current, or the like; also, to seesaw, as a pair of alternators working in parallel.

2. (Change Ringing)

To shift up and down in order regularly.

 

© Webster 1913


Hunt, v. t. (Change Ringing)

To move or shift the order of (a bell) in a regular course of changes.

 

© Webster 1913

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.