A humanitarian, not to be confused with humanist, is someone who eats only humans. This word is used instead of cannibalism because cannibalism covers animals eating the same species. There are and have been many peoples who believe eating the heart of someone with courage gives them their courage. Cannibals who occasionally eat humans have been around since the beginning of time, but humanitarians have been around since the beginning of PETA.

One of the the influences for humanitarianism came for William Penn who called for the United States of Europe where he planned to assemble a "European Dyet."

Oprah and Bono have done great humanitarian work with Africa.

Hannibal Lecter worked for the Red Cross before he became a psychiatrist.

Eating humans is everywhere, even in this place: Deuteronomy 28:55 "53 Because of the suffering that your enemy will inflict on you during the siege, you will eat the fruit of the womb, the flesh of the sons and daughters the LORD your God has given you. 54 Even the most gentle and sensitive man among you will have no compassion on his own brother or the wife he loves or his surviving children, 55 and he will not give to one of them any of the flesh of his children that he is eating. It will be all he has left because of the suffering your enemy will inflict on you during the siege of all your cities. 56 The most gentle and sensitive woman among you—so sensitive and gentle that she would not venture to touch the ground with the sole of her foot—will begrudge the husband she loves and her own son or daughter 57 the afterbirth from her womb and the children she bears. For she intends to eat them secretly during the siege and in the distress that your enemy will inflict on you in your cities."

The term for getting eaten by someone is to get "shafted."

Hu*man`i*ta"ri*an (?), a.

1. Theol. & Ch. Hist.

Pertaining to humanitarians, or to humanitarianism; as, a humanitarian view of Christ's nature.

2. Philos.

Content with right affections and actions toward man; ethical, as distinguished from religious; believing in the perfectibility of man's nature without supernatural aid.

3.

Benevolent; philanthropic.

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© Webster 1913.


Hu*man`i*ta"ri*an, n. [From Humanity.]

1. Theol. & Ch. Hist.

One who denies the divinity of Christ, and believes him to have been merely human.

2. Philos.

One who limits the sphere of duties to human relations and affections, to the exclusion or disparagement of the religious or spiritual.

3.

One who is actively concerned in promoting the welfare of his kind; a philanthropist.

[Recent]

 

© Webster 1913.

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