Groan (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Groaned (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Groaning.] [OE. gronen, granen, granien, AS. grnian, fr. the root of grennian to grin. 35. See 2d Grin, and cf. Grunt.]

1.

To give forth a low, moaning sound in breathing; to utter a groan, as in pain, in sorrow, or in derision; to moan.

For we . . . do groan, being burdened. 2 Cor. v. 4.

He heard the groaning of the oak. Sir W. Scott.

2.

To strive after earnestly, as with groans.

Nothing but holy, pure, and clear, Or that which groaneth to be so. Herbert.

 

© Webster 1913.


Groan, v. t.

To affect by groans.

 

© Webster 1913.


Groan, n.

A low, moaning sound; usually, a deep, mournful sound uttered in pain or great distress; sometimes, an expression of strong disapprobation; as, the remark was received with groans.

Such groans of roaring wind and rain. Shak.

The wretched animal heaved forth such groans. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

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