A term used to denote little things, usually in great numbers, such as marbles, jacks, nick nacks, etc...

Synonymous with:

Thing-a-ma-jig

Do Dads

Do Hickey

Thingy

Bric-a-brac

Flotsam & Jetsam

Such can be seen in Ye Olde Curiousity Shop or in the Boxes of Joseph Cornell.

Gew"gaw (?), n. [OE. gigawe, gugawe, gewgaude, prob. the same word as OE. givegove gewgaw, apparently a reduplicated form fr. AS. gifan to give; cf. also F. joujou plaything, and E. gaud, n. See Give, and cf. Giffgaff.]

A showy trifle; a toy; a splendid plaything; a pretty but worthless bauble.

A heavy gewgaw called a crown. Dryden.

 

© Webster 1913.


Gew"gaw, a.

Showy; unreal; pretentious.

Seeing his gewgaw castle shine. Tennyson.

 

© Webster 1913.

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