The verb foist serves as a catch-all for that which is deceit. It comes from the Dutch vuisten which means "to take in fist".

In one sense, to foist is to claim that something of little value is actually of great value.
In another, it describes defrauding another person.
In yet another, it is to impose an undesirable state on someone without their ability to resist.

Foist (foist), n. [OF. fuste stick, boat, fr. L. fustis cudgel. Cf. 1st Fust.]

A light and fast-sailing ship.

[Obs.]

Beau. & Fl.

 

© Webster 1913.


Foist, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Foisted; p. pr. & vb. n. Foisting.] [Cf. OD. vysten to fizzle, D. veesten, E. fizz, fitchet, bullfist.]

To insert surreptitiously, wrongfully, or without warrant; to interpolate; to pass off (something spurious or counterfeit) as genuine, true, or worthy; -- usually followed by in.

Lest negligence or partiality might admit or fois? in abuses corruption. R. Carew.

When a scripture has been corrupted . . . by a supposititious foisting of some words in. South.

 

© Webster 1913.


Foist, n.

1.

A foister; a sharper.

[Obs.]

B. Jonson.

2.

A trick or fraud; a swindle.

[Obs.]

B. Jonson.

 

© Webster 1913.

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