Euclid's Elements : Book II : Geometric algebra

Definitions

Definition 1
Any rectangular parallelogram is said to be contained by the two straight lines containing the right angle.
Definition 2
And in any parallelogrammic area let any one whatever of the parallelograms about its diameter with the two complements be called a gnomon.

Propositions

Proposition 1
If there are two straight lines, and one of them is cut into any number of segments whatever, then the rectangle contained by the two straight lines equals the sum of the rectangles contained by the uncut straight line and each of the segments.
Proposition 2
If a straight line is cut at random, then the sum of the rectangles contained by the whole and each of the segments equals the square on the whole.
Proposition 3
If a straight line is cut at random, then the rectangle contained by the whole and one of the segments equals the sum of the rectangle contained by the segments and the square on the aforesaid segment.
Proposition 4
If a straight line is cut at random, the square on the whole equals the squares on the segments plus twice the rectangle contained by the segments.
Proposition 5
If a straight line is cut into equal and unequal segments, then the rectangle contained by the unequal segments of the whole together with the square on the straight line between the points of section equals the square on the half.
Proposition 6
If a straight line is bisected and a straight line is added to it in a straight line, then the rectangle contained by the whole with the added straight line and the added straight line together with the square on the half equals the square on the straight line made up of the half and the added straight line.
Proposition 7
If a straight line is cut at random, then the sum of the square on the whole and that on one of the segments equals twice the rectangle contained by the whole and the said segment plus the square on the remaining segment.
Proposition 8
If a straight line is cut at random, then four times the rectangle contained by the whole and one of the segments plus the square on the remaining segment equals the square described on the whole and the aforesaid segment as on one straight line.
Proposition 9
If a straight line is cut into equal and unequal segments, then the sum of the squares on the unequal segments of the whole is double the sum of the square on the half and the square on the straight line between the points of section.
Proposition 10
If a straight line is bisected, and a straight line is added to it in a straight line, then the square on the whole with the added straight line and the square on the added straight line both together are double the sum of the square on the half and the square described on the straight line made up of the half and the added straight line as on one straight line.
Proposition 11
To cut a given straight line so that the rectangle contained by the whole and one of the segments equals the square on the remaining segment.
Proposition 12
In obtuse-angled triangles the square on the side opposite the obtuse angle is greater than the sum of the squares on the sides containing the obtuse angle by twice the rectangle contained by one of the sides about the obtuse angle, namely that on which the perpendicular falls, and the straight line cut off outside by the perpendicular towards the obtuse angle.
Proposition 13
In acute-angled triangles the square on the side opposite the acute angle is less than the sum of the squares on the sides containing the acute angle by twice the rectangle contained by one of the sides about the acute angle, namely that on which the perpendicular falls, and the straight line cut off within by the perpendicular towards the acute angle.
Proposition 14
To construct a square equal to a given rectilinear figure.

Euclid's Elements: Book I <--- Book II ---> Euclid's Elements: Book III

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