Dis*tort" (?), a. [L. distortus, p. p. of distorquere to twist, distort; dis- + torquere to twist. See Torsion.]

Distorted; misshapen.

[Obs.]

Her face was ugly and her mouth distort. Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dis*tort", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Distorted; p. pr. & vb. n. Distorting.]

1.

To twist of natural or regular shape; to twist aside physically; as, to distort the limbs, or the body.

Whose face was distorted with pain. Thackeray.

2.

To force or put out of the true posture or direction; to twist aside mentally or morally.

Wrath and malice, envy and revenge, do darken and distort the understandings of men. Tillotson.

3.

To wrest from the true meaning; to pervert; as, to distort passages of Scripture, or their meaning.

Syn. -- To twist; wrest; deform; pervert.

 

© Webster 1913.

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