Dis*taste" (?), n.

1.

Aversion of the taste; dislike, as of food or drink; disrelish.

Bacon.

2.

Discomfort; uneasiness.

Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes, and adversity is not without comforts and hopes. Bacon.

3.

Alienation of affection; displeasure; anger.

On the part of Heaven, Now alienated, distance and distaste. Milton.

Syn. -- Disrelish; disinclination; dislike; aversion; displeasure; dissatisfaction; disgust.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dis*taste", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Distasted; p. pr. & vb. n. Distasting.]

1.

Not to have relish or taste for; to disrelish; to loathe; to dislike.

Although my will distaste what it elected. Shak.

2.

To offend; to disgust; to displease.

[Obs.]

He thought in no policy to distaste the English or Irish by a course of reformation, but sought to please them. Sir J. Davies.

3.

To deprive of taste or relish; to make unsavory or distasteful.

Drayton.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dis*taste" (?), v. i.

To be distasteful; to taste ill or disagreeable.

[Obs.]

Dangerous conceits are, in their natures, poisons, Which at the are scarce found to distaste. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.