Der"o*gate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Derogated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Derogating (?).] [L. derogatus, p. p. of derogare to derogate; de- + rogare to ask, to ask the people about a law. See Rogation.]

1.

To annul in part; to repeal partly; to restrict; to limit the action of; -- said of a law.

By several contrary customs, . . . many of the civil and canon laws are controlled and derogated. Sir M. Hale.

2.

To lessen; to detract from; to disparage; to depreciate; -- said of a person or thing.

[R.]

Anything . . . that should derogate, minish, or hurt his glory and his name. Sir T. More.

 

© Webster 1913.


Der"o*gate (?), v. i.

1.

To take away; to detract; to withdraw; -- usually with from.

If we did derogate from them whom their industry hath made great. Hooker.

It derogates little from his fortitude, while it adds infinitely to the honor of his humanity. Burke.

2.

To act beneath one-s rank, place, birth, or character; to degenerate.

[R.]

You are a fool granted; therefore your issues, being foolish, do not derogate. Shak.

Would Charles X. derogate from his ancestors? Would he be the degenerate scion of that royal line? Hazlitt.

 

© Webster 1913.


Der"o*gate (?), n. [L. derogatus, p. p.]

Diminished in value; dishonored; degraded.

[R.]

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

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