Travelling food prepared by the Men of Esgaroth, a hard and tasteless but very nutritious biscuit or small cake.

Mentioned in The Fellowship of the Ring on page 478 and on pages 232 and 247 of The Hobbit. Outside of Middle-Earth, also found in Nethack, frequently among the possessions of slain soldiers.

Cram (kr?m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Crammed (kr?md); p. pr. & vb. n. Cramming.] [AS. crammian to cram; akin to Icel. kremia to squeeze, bruise, Sw. krama to press. Cf. Cramp.]

1.

To press, force, or drive, particularly in filling, or in thrustung one thing into another; to stuff; to crowd; to fill to superfluity; as, to cram anything into a basket; to cram a room with people.

Their storehouses crammed with grain. Shak.

He will cram his brass down our throats. Swift.

2.

To fill with food to satiety; to stuff.

Children would be freer from disease if they were not crammed so much as they are by fond mothers. Locke.

Cram us with praise, and make us As fat as tame things. Shak.

3.

To put hastily through an extensive course of memorizing or study, as in preparation for an examination; as, a pupil is crammed by his tutor.

 

© Webster 1913.


Cram, v. i.

1.

To eat greedly, and to satiety; to stuff.

Gluttony . . . . Crms, and blasphemes his feeder. Milton.

2.

To make crude preparation for a special occasion, as an examination, by a hasty and extensive course of memorizing or study.

[Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Cram, n.

1.

The act of cramming.

2.

Innformation hastily memorized; as. a cram from an examination.

[Colloq.]

3. Weaving

A warp having more than two threads passing through each dent or split of the reed.

 

© Webster 1913.

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