Com*port" (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Comported; p. pr. & vb. n. Comporting.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com- + portare to carry. See Port demeanor.]

1.

To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport with an injury.

[Obs.]

Barrow.

2.

To agree; to accord; to suit; -- sometimes followed by with.

How ill this dullness doth comport with greatness. Beau. & Fl.

How their behavior herein comported with the institution. Locke.

 

© Webster 1913.


Com*port" (?), v. t.

1.

To bear; to endure; to brook; to put with.

[Obs.]

The malcontented sort That never can the present state comport. Daniel.

2.

To carry; to conduct; -- with a reflexive pronoun.

Observe how Lord Somers . . . comported himself. Burke.

 

© Webster 1913.


Com"port (?, formerly ), n. [Cf.OF. comport.]

Manner of acting; behavior; conduct; deportment.

[Obs.]

I knew them well, and marked their rude comport. Dryden.

 

© Webster 1913.

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