Clam"or (?), n. [OF. clamour, clamur, F. clameur, fr. L. clamor, fr. clamare to cry out. See Claim.]

1.

A great outcry or vociferation; loud and continued shouting or exclamation.

Shak.

2.

Any loud and continued noise.

Addison.

3.

A continued expression of dissatisfaction or discontent; a popular outcry.

Macaulay.

Syn. -- Outcry; exclamation; noise; uproar.

 

© Webster 1913.


Clam"or, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Clamored (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Clamoring.]

1.

To salute loudly.

[R.]

The people with a shout Rifted the air, clamoring their god with praise. Milton
.

2.

To stun with noise.

[R.]

Bacon.

3.

To utter loudly or repeatedly; to shout.

Clamored their piteous prayer incessantly. Longfellow.

To clamor bells, to repeat the strokes quickly so as to produce a loud clang. Bp. Warburion.

 

© Webster 1913.


Clam"or, v. i.

To utter loud sounds or outcries; to vociferate; to complain; to make importunate demands.

The obscure bird Clamored the livelong night. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

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