A thick layer of skin built up in response to a frequent or constant irritation. Also a sense of numbness in the realm of the emotional resulting from similar exposures.

Callus is an arcade game emulator written by Bloodlust Software.

http://bloodlust.zophar.net/Callus/callus.html

Callus allows you to play most Capcom CPS arcade games on your computer. Callus supports most of the CPS1 games, but not all of them because of some encryption issues. One of the best things about Callus is that it is very fast, most games will be full speed on a Pentium 100. While the equivalent games on the MAME emulator take about twice as much CPU to play full speed.

Today, Callus has been completely swallowed up by MAME,but it still performs better on slower processors. Making it an excellent choice for those of you that have early pentium processors. This is also an excellent emulator to use if you are building an arcade emulation cabinet, and only have an older computer to do the emulation duties. A simple Pentium 100 computer, and I-Pac encoder, a few joysticks and the Callus emulator adds up to a very cheap multi-game cabinet.

Supported Games
When playing the bass guitar, having good callouses on the fingers of both hands is only slightly less important than having an instrument to play, and is certainly more important than an amp or an appropriate string guage or stomp boxes or a badass attitude or musical knowledge.

Don't believe me? You try grooving on round wound steel strings for 30 minutes with virgin fingers, and just you wait and see how much skin is left on your fingers and how much is embedded in the strings.

This could be one reason why chicks dig the piano player, or at least prefer him over the bass player: a pianist's hands aren't usually a glove made of dead skin.

Cal"lus (?), n. [L. See Callous.]

1. Med. (a)

Same as Callosity

. (b

The material of repair in fractures of bone; a substance exuded at the site of fracture, which is at first soft or cartilaginous in consistence, but is ultimately converted into true bone and unites the fragments into a single piece.

2. Hort.

The new formation over the end of a cutting, before it puts out rootlets.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.