A general term for a collection of related professional wrestling holds, in which the initiator wraps his arm around the back of the neck of a standing opponent that is facing away from him, and then procedes to use his body weight to drive the recipient into the mat, face first. Variations include those done with both parties standing, those done with only the initiator running, and those done with both parties running, not to mention flying bulldogs, which are done off of the turnbuckle.

The Bulldog is a very unique breed that was originally bred for the purpose of attacking bulls for entertainment (aka bullbaiting). It's easily differentiated from other breeds and their gentle manner makes them excellent companions.

A Bulldog is not the type of dog that will jog alongside you in the park or perform endless tricks. Like most any dog, it will do anything to please its master. They can be recognized by their large heads, flat nose and wrinkled face. The front legs and upper body are much larger than the rearend in a true show quality dog.

There is also a French Bulldog which much closer resembles a Pug than a traditional Bulldog. This could be because it is believed that Bulldogs came from cross-breeding the Pug and the Mastiff.

In rodeos, to bulldog an animal is to rope it and wrestle it to the ground. This has been done since ancient times, but the first modern cowboy to bulldog a beast was Bill Pickett, born 1870 in Texas. This black cowboy would ride his horse up to about five feet from the animal, jump onto its back, and grab one horn with each hand to twist its head back toward him. Then he made up for his being only five foot seven and 145 pounds by taking a tip from the dogs and actually biting the bull/steer on its lower lip or nose, to render it frozen with pain and thus more docile. After this, he could usually throw himself and the steer backwards or sideways to the ground. This technique was developed while herding cattle out on the ranch, but proved spectacular in rodeos as well.

Not too many other bulldoggers use that part of the "Dusky Demon"'s techique, but the event has kept the common name "bulldogging," though rodeos officially call it "steer wrestling" now. The modern bulldogger jumps onto the steer from his horse, tries to put his feet down to get the running animal stopped, and then wrestles the animal to its side with all its legs pointed in the same direction -- with times for 5 to 8 seconds for the best bulldoggers!

Sources:
Carlson, Laurie Winn. Cattle: An Informal Social History. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2001.
http://www.cs.uh.edu/~clifton/pickett.micro.html
http://www.toptags.com/aama/bio/men/bpickett.htm
http://www.virtualtexan.com/readingroom/books/pickett/pickett1.htm
http://www.virtualtexan.com/readingroom/books/pickett/pickett3.htm

Bull"dog` (?), n.

1. Zool.

A variety of dog, of remarkable ferocity, courage, and tenacity of grip; -- so named, probably, from being formerly employed in baiting bulls.

2. Metal.

A refractory material used as a furnace lining, obtained by calcining the cinder or slag from the puddling furnace of a rolling mill.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bull"dog`, a.

Characteristic of, or like, a bulldog; stubborn; as, bulldog courage; bulldog tenacity.

Bulldog bat zo'94l., a bat of the genus Nyctinomus; -- so called from the shape of its face.

 

© Webster 1913.

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