Bate (?), n. [Prob. abbrev. from debate.]

Strife; contention.

[Obs.]

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bated; p. pr. & vb. n. Bating.] [From abate.]

1.

To lessen by retrenching, deducting, or reducing; to abate; to beat down; to lower.

He must either bate the laborer's wages, or not employ or not pay him. Locke.

2.

To allow by way of abatement or deduction.

To whom he bates nothing or what he stood upon with the parliament. South.

3.

To leave out; to except.

[Obs.]

Bate me the king, and, be he flesh and blood. He lies that says it. Beau. & Fl.

4.

To remove.

[Obs.]

About autumn bate the earth from about the roots of olives, and lay them bare. Holland.

5.

To deprive of.

[Obs.]

When baseness is exalted, do not bate The place its honor for the person's sake. Herbert.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate, v. i.

1.

To remit or retrench a part; -- with of.

Abate thy speed, and I will bate of mine. Dryden.

2.

To waste away.

[Obs.]

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate (?), v. t.

To attack; to bait.

[Obs.]

Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate, imp.

of Bite.

[Obs.]

Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate, v. i. [F. battre des ailes to flutter. Cf. Bait to flutter.]

To flutter as a hawk; to bait.

[Obs.]

Bacon.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate, n. Jewish Antiq.

See 2d Bath.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate, n. [Cf. Sw. beta maceration, soaking, G. beize, and E. bite.]

An alkaline solution consisting of the dung of certain animals; -- employed in the preparation of hides; grainer.

Knight.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bate, v. t.

To steep in bate, as hides, in the manufacture of leather.

 

© Webster 1913.

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